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CVE-9 U.S.S. Bogue - History

CVE-9 U.S.S. Bogue - History



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Bairoko

(CVE~115: dP. 10,330; 1. 557'1"; b. 106'2", dr. 32', s.
19.1 k.; cpl. 1066; a. 2 5"; cl. Commencement Bay)

Portage Bay (CVE~115) was renamed Bairoko 5 June 1944; launched 25 January 1945 by Todd-Pacific Shipyards, Inc., Tacoma, Wash.; sponsored by Mrs. J. Ballentine, wife of Rear Admiral Ballentine, and commissioned 16 July 1945, Captain H. B. Temple in command.

Commissioned too late to take an active part in World War II, Bairoko engaged in peacetime fleet cruises, maneuvers, and exercises until December 1949. During the period she made two cruises to the Far East (18 October 1945-25 January 1946 and 18 February-30 May 19471, and participated in the atomic bomb test at Eniwetok Atoll. On 15 December 1949 she reported to San Francisco for pre inactivation overhaul and went out of commission in reserve 14 April 1950.

When the Korean conflict broke out Bairoko was immediately readied for active duty. She was recommissioned 12 September 1950 and reported to the Pacific Fleet. Between November 1950 and August 1953 she made three extended cruises to the Far East (14 November 1950-15 August 1951, 1 December 1951-9 June 1952 and February-August 1953), acting in support of the United Nations Forces in Korea. Her planes flew hundreds of strikes against North Korean and "Chinese Volunteer" troops, installations, transportation facilities, and naval units. On 9 May 1951 she had five men killed and 13 injured by an explosion and flash fire in Japanese waters.

Returning to the west coast late in August 1953, Bairoko remained there until January 1954 when she departed to assist in the hydrogen bomb tests in the Eniwetok-Bikini area. From May through June 1954 she operated out of San Diego on training exercise~. In July 1954 she reported to Long Beach Naval Shipyard to commence preinactivation overhaul and went out of commission in reserve at San Francisco 18 February 1955.

Bairoko received three battle stars for her Korean service.


CVE-9 U.S.S. Bogue - History

(ACV-9: dp. 9800 1. 495'8": b. 111'6" dr. 2ff' 8. 18
k cpl. 890 a. 2 5" cl. Bogue)

Bogue was originally classified AVG-9 but was changed to ACV-9, 20 August 1942 CVE 9, 19 July 1943 and CVH1

9, 12 June 1955. She was launched 15 January 1942,by Seattle-Tacoma Shiphuilding Co., Tacoma, Wash., under a Maritime Commission contract sponsored by Mrs. W. Miller, Jr., wife of Lieutenant Commander Miller, transferred to the Navy 1 May 1942 and commissioned 26 September 1942, Captain G.E. Short command.

After an extensive shakedown and repair period Bogue joined the Atlantic Fleet in February 1942 as the nucleus of the pioneer American anti

iubmarine hunterkiller group. During March and April 1943 she made three North Atlantic crossings but sank no submarines. She departed on her fourth crossing 22 April and got her flrat submarine 22 May when her aircraft sauk U-569 in 50°40' N,, 36°21' W. During her fltth North Atlantic cruise her planes sank two German submarines: U-217 in 30°1S' N., 42°50' W., 5 June and U-118 in 30°49' N., 33°49' W., 12 June. On 23 July 1943, during her seventh patrol, her planes sank V - 27 in 35°25' N., 27056, W. George E. Badger (DD-126), of her screen, sank U - '18 during this patrol.

Bogue's eighth patrol was her most productive with three German submarines sunk: U - 6 by planes, 29 November 1943 in 39°33' N., 19°01' W., U-172 by planes, aeorge IV. Badger, DuPont (DD-152 ), Clemson ( DD-186 ), and Osmond Ingram (DD-255), 13 December in 26°19' N., 29°58' W. and U - 50 by planes, 20 December in 32°54' N., 37°01' W.

Bogue had a break from her anti-submarine operations during January and February 1944 when she carried a cargo of Army flghters to Glasgow, Scotland. The carrier then returned to her anti-submarine role and on 13 March her aircraft teamed with British planes, Haverpleld (DE393), Zlobson (DLk464), and HMS Prince Rupert to sunk U

On 5 May 1944 Bogue and her escorts departed Hampton Roads, Va`, for a cruise that netted two more submarines and lasted until 2 July. Franois M. Robinson (D

220), of the screen, sank the .Japanese RO-.

01 (exGerman U 1224) on 13 May and Bogue's planes sank the Japanese I-52 in 15°16' N., 39°55' W., on 24 June. During the next cruise, 24 July-24 September 1944, Boguets planes sank another German submarine, U-1229, 20 August in 42°20' N., 51°39' W.

Following her return in September 1944 Bogue operated on training missions out of Bermuda and Quonset Point R. I., until February 1945 when she made a trip to Liverpool, llngland, with Army planes. In April 1945 she put to sea again as an anti-submarine vessel, forming part of Captain a. J. Dufek's Second Barrier Force. On 24 April success came as Flaherty (DID 135), Neunzer (DE150), Chatelain (DE-149), Varian (DD

798), Hubbard (DE211), Janseen (DE

396), Pillsbury (DE: 133) and Keith (DE 241) sank U

546. This was the last of 13 submarine sank by Bogue or her escorte.

With the war in the Atlantie over, Bogue moved to the Pacific, arriving at San Diego 3 July 1945. She then steamed westward to Guam, arriving 2July. She made a trip to Adak, Alaska (12 August-11 September 1945), and then Joined the "Magic Carpet" fleet returning servicemen from the Pacifle islands She was placed out of commission in reserve 30 November 1946 at Tacoma, Wash.

Bogue received a Presidential Unit Citation and three battle stars for her World War II service.


BOGUE CVE 9

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Bogue Class Escort Carrier
    Keel Laid 1 October 1941 as SS STEEL ADVOCATE
    Launched 15 January 1942
    Acquired by U.S. Navy 1 May 1942
    Originally classified Aircraft Escort Vessel (AVG)
    Reclassified Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier (ACV) 20 August 1942
    Reclassified Escort Carrier (CVE) 15 July 1943

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each name of the ship (for example, Bushnell AG-32 / Sumner AGS-5 are different names for the same ship so there should be one set of pages for Bushnell and one set for Sumner). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each name and/or commissioning period. Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


USS Bogue Models CVE-9, Aircraft Carriers, Military Ship Models and Kits, Books, DVD Movies.

The USS Bogue CVE-9 fought in WW2. A total of 45 ships of the class were built. USS Bogue (CVE-9) was the lead ship in the Bogue-class of escort aircraft carriers in the United States Navy during World War II. She was laid down on 1 October 1941 as Steel Advocate (hull 170) under Maritime Commission contract by Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding in Tacoma, Washington. She was originally classified AVG-9, but was changed to ACV-9, 20 August 1942 CVE-9, 15 July 1943 and CVHP-9, 12 June 1955.

The success of using aircraft carriers brought tremendous firepower to the US Navy and Naval ground support. An Aircraft Carrier is a battle force in itself bringing the fight to the enemy. These model ships of the USS Bogue, CVE9 bring the history of the Navy into your home. Building models are also a super training ground for kids, learning about construction technology and navy history all at the same time. Building a model ship is the ultimate training tool for any kid in any family as well as bringing hours of enjoyment and fun in building models and showing the models after they were built. If you want a smart kid, start him or her building models. C. Jeff Dyrek, Webmaster.

USS Bogue CVE-9 Aircraft Carrier

The Bogue class escort carriers were based on the Type C3 cargo ship hull of the Maritime Commission. Most were built by the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation, but some of the early examples were produced by Ingalls Shipbuilding of Pascagoula, Mississippi and by the Western Pipe and Steel Company of San Francisco, California. They all were named for sounds, and were equipped with derricks for retrieving seaplanes. Most of the ships of the class were transferred to the Royal Navy under the provisions of the Lend-Lease program they were given new names for their RN service and returned to the U.S. Navy after the war. The first group to be transferred were known by the RN as the Attacker class in their place replacements were constructed with the same names for the American fleet. A second group of ships were built and sent almost in its entirety to the Royal Navy, known as the Ameer class or the Ruler class in British service, and sometimes as the Prince William class in the U.S. Navy.

Navy The US Navy Type Escort carrier Class Bogue Pennant CVE 9 Built by Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp. (Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.) Ordered Laid down 1 Oct 1941 Launched 15 Jan 1942 Commissioned 26 Sep 1942 End service 30 Nov 1946 History Decommissioned 30 November 1946. Stricken 1 March 1959. Sold and scrapped in Japan starting December 1960. Commands listed for USS Bogue (CVE 9) Please note that we're still working on this section. Commander From To 1 Capt. Giles Ezra Short, USN 26 Sep 1942 9 Jul 1943 (1) 2 Capt. Joseph Brantley Dunn, USN 9 Jul 1943 2 Jul 1944 3 Capt. Aurelius Bartlett Vosseller, USN 2 Jul 1944 5 Oct 1944 4 Capt. George John Dufek, USN 5 Oct 1944 7 Sep 1945 (1) You can help improve our commands section Click here to Submit events/comments/updates for this vessel. Please use this if you spot mistakes or want to improve this ships page. Notable events involving Bogue include: 22 May 1943 German U-boat U-569 was scuttled by her own crew in the North Atlantic, in position 50°40'N, 35°21'W, after being badly damaged by depth charges from 2 Avenger aircraft of the US escort carrier USS Bogue. 5 Jun 1943 German U-boat U-217 was sunk in the mid-Atlantic in position 30°18'N, 42°50'W by depth charges from an Avenger aircraft (VC-9 USN/T-11), assisted by a Wildcat aircraft (VC-9 USN/F-13), of the US escort carrier USS Bogue. 12 Jun 1943 German U-boat U-118 was sunk in the mid-Atlantic west of the Canary Islands, in position 30°49'N, 33°49'W by depth charges from eight Avenger aircraft of the US escort carrier USS Bogue. 23 Jul 1943 German U-boat U-527 was sunk in the mid-Atlantic south of the Azores during support of U-648, in position 35°25'N, 27°56'W, by depth charges from Avenger aircraft (VC-9) of the US escort carrier USS Bogue 13 Dec 1943 German U-boat U-172 was sunk on 13 December 1943 in the mid-Atlantic after a 27 hour fight west of the Canary Islands, in position 26°29'N, 29°58'W, by depth charges and Fido homing torpedoes from Avenger and Wildcat aircraft (VC-19) of the American escort carrier USS Bogue and by some 200 depth charges from the US destroyers USS George E. Badger, USS Clemson, USS Osmond Ingram and USS Du Pont. 20 Dec 1943 German U-boat U-850 was sunk in the mid-Atlantic west of Madeira, in position 32°54'N, 37°01'W, by depth charges and Fido homing torpedoes from 5 Avenger and Wildcat aircraft (VC-19) of the American escort carrier USS Bogue. 13 Mar 1944 German U-boat U-575 was sunk in the north Atlantic north of the Azores, in position 46°18'N, 27°34'W, by depth charges from the Canadian frigate HMCS Prince Rupert, the US destroyer USS Hobson the US destroyer escort USS Haverfield and by depth charges from a British Wellington and Fortress aircraft (Sqdn. 172/B and 206/R and 220/J) and Avenger aircraft of the US escort carrier USS Bogue. 24 Jun 1944 During the night of 23/24 June 1944 Avenger aircraft from USS Bogue sink the Japanese submarine I-52 (offsite link) with acoustic homing torpedoes in the Atlantic about 850 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands in approximate position 15°16'N, 39°55'W. More details about the sinking of I-52, including photos of the air attacks and other original documents can be found on our partner website uboatarchive.net: I-52 sunk by VC-69 aircraft from USS Bogue on 24 June 1944 20 Aug 1944 German U-boat U-1229 was sunk in the North Atlantic south-east of Newfoundland, in position 42°20'N, 51°39'W, by depth charges and rockets from 3 Avenger and 2 Wildcat aircraft (VC-42) of the US escort carrier USS Bogue.

Please note: The background picture on this page was taken when I was stationed on theUSS Kitty Hawk in 1977-1978 in the Western Pacific.
C. Jeff Dyrek, Webmaster.


Contents

After an extensive shakedown and repair period Bogue joined the Atlantic Fleet in February 1943 as the nucleus of the pioneer American anti-submarine hunter-killer group. During March and April 1943 she made three North Atlantic crossings but sank no submarines. She departed on her fourth crossing 22 April and got her first submarine 22 May when her aircraft sank U-569 at Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found. .

During her fifth North Atlantic cruise her planes sank two German submarines: U-217 at Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found. ., 5 June and U-118 at Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found. ., 12 June.

On 23 July 1943, during her seventh patrol, her planes sank U-527 at Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found. . The destroyer George E. Badger, of her screen, sank U-613 during this patrol.

Bogue 's eighth patrol was her most productive with three German submarines sunk. U-86 was sunk by her planes on 29 November 1943 at Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found. . On 30 November, Grumman TBF Avengers from Bogue damaged U-238 east of the Azores. [3] On 13 December U-172 was sunk by her planes, along with destroyers George E. Badger, Du Pont, Clemson and Osmond Ingram at Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found. . And on 20 December U-850 was sunk by planes at Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found. .

Bogue had a break from her anti-submarine operations during January and February 1944 when she carried a cargo of Army fighters to Glasgow, Scotland. The carrier then returned to her anti-submarine role and on 13 March her aircraft teamed with British planes, Haverfield, Hobson and the RCN River-class frigate HMCS Prince Rupert to sink U-575 at Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found. .

On 5 May 1944, Bogue and her escorts departed Hampton Roads, Virginia, for a cruise that netted two more submarines and lasted until 2 July. Francis M. Robinson, of the screen, sank the Japanese RO-501 (ex-German U-1224) on 13 May and Bogue’s aircraft sank the Japanese submarine I-52 at Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found. ., on 24 June. During the next cruise, 24 July–24 September 1944, Bogue's planes sank another German submarine, U-1229, 20 August at Lua error in Module:Coordinates at line 668: callParserFunction: function "#coordinates" was not found. .

Following her return in September 1944, Bogue operated on training missions out of Bermuda and Quonset Point, Rhode Island, until February 1945 when she made a trip to Liverpool, England, with Army planes. In April 1945, she put to sea again as an anti-submarine vessel, forming part of Captain George J. Dufek's Second Barrier Force during Operation Teardrop. On 24 April, success came as Flaherty, Neunzer, Chatelain, Varian, Hubbard, Janssen, Pillsbury and Keith sank U-546. This was the last of 13 submarines sunk by Bogue or her escorts.

With the war in the Atlantic over, Bogue moved to the Pacific, arriving at San Diego 3 July 1945. She then steamed westward to Guam, arriving 24 July. She made a trip to Adak, Alaska (19 August to 6 September 1945), and then joined the "Operation Magic Carpet" fleet returning servicemen from the Pacific islands. She was placed out of commission in reserve 30 November 1946 at Tacoma, Washington.


CVE-9 U.S.S. Bogue - History

Download this Cruise Book as high resolution .pdf file

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After an extensive shakedown and repair period Bogue joined the Atlantic Fleet in February 1943 as the nucleus of the pioneer American anti-submarine hunter-killer group. USS Bogue_sentence_6

During March and April 1943 she made three North Atlantic crossings but sank no submarines. USS Bogue_sentence_7

She departed on her fourth crossing on 22 April and claimed her first submarine on 22 May when her aircraft sank the German submarine U-569 at . USS Bogue_sentence_8

During her fifth North Atlantic cruise her planes sank two German submarines: U-217 at on 5 June and U-118 at on 12 June. USS Bogue_sentence_9

On 23 July 1943, during her seventh patrol, her planes sank U-527 at . USS Bogue_sentence_10

The destroyer George E. Badger, of her screen, sank U-613 during this patrol. USS Bogue_sentence_11

Bogue's eighth patrol was her most productive with three German submarines sunk. USS Bogue_sentence_12

U-86 was sunk by her planes on 29 November 1943 at . USS Bogue_sentence_13

On 30 November, Grumman TBF Avengers from Bogue damaged U-238 east of the Azores. USS Bogue_sentence_14

On 13 December U-172 was sunk by her planes, with the aid of destroyers George E. Badger, Du Pont, Clemson and Osmond Ingram at . USS Bogue_sentence_15

And on 20 December U-850 was sunk by planes at . USS Bogue_sentence_16

Bogue had a break from her anti-submarine operations during January and February 1944 when she carried a cargo of United States Army fighter aircraft to Glasgow, Scotland. USS Bogue_sentence_17

The carrier then returned to her anti-submarine role and on 13 March her aircraft teamed with British planes, Haverfield, Hobson and the RCN River-class frigate Prince Rupert to sink U-575 at . USS Bogue_sentence_18

On 5 May 1944, Bogue and her escorts departed Hampton Roads, Virginia, for a cruise that netted two more submarines and lasted until 2 July. USS Bogue_sentence_19

Francis M. Robinson, of the screen, sank the Japanese RO-501 (ex-German U-1224) on 13 May and Bogue's aircraft sank the Japanese submarine I-52 at on 24 June. USS Bogue_sentence_20

During the next cruise, from 24 July to 24 September 1944, Bogue's planes sank another German submarine, U-1229, on 20 August at . USS Bogue_sentence_21

Following her return in September 1944, Bogue operated on training missions out of Bermuda and Quonset Point, Rhode Island, until February 1945 when she made a trip to Liverpool, England, with Army planes. USS Bogue_sentence_22

In April 1945, she put to sea again as an anti-submarine vessel, forming part of Captain George J. Dufek's Second Barrier Force during Operation Teardrop. USS Bogue_sentence_23

On 24 April, success came as Flaherty, Neunzer, Chatelain, Varian, Hubbard, Janssen, Pillsbury and Keith sank U-546. USS Bogue_sentence_24

This was the last of 13 submarines sunk by Bogue or her escorts. USS Bogue_sentence_25

With the war in the Atlantic over, Bogue moved to the Pacific, arriving at San Diego on 3 July 1945. USS Bogue_sentence_26

She then steamed westward to Guam, arriving on 24 July. USS Bogue_sentence_27

She made a trip to Adak, Alaska (19 August to 6 September 1945), and then joined the "Operation Magic Carpet" fleet returning servicemen from the Pacific islands. USS Bogue_sentence_28

She was placed out of commission in reserve on 30 November 1946 at Tacoma, Washington. USS Bogue_sentence_29


Contents

After an extensive shakedown and repair period Bogue joined the Atlantic Fleet in February 1943 as the nucleus of the pioneer American anti-submarine hunter-killer group. During March and April 1943 she made three North Atlantic crossings but sank no submarines. She departed on her fourth crossing 22 April and got her first submarine 22 May when her aircraft sank U-569 at 50°40′N 35°21′W  /  50.667°N 35.35°W  / 50.667 -35.35 .

During her fifth North Atlantic cruise her planes sank two German submarines: U-217 at 30°18′N 42°50′W  /  30.3°N 42.833°W  / 30.3 -42.833 ., 5 June and U-118 at 30°49′N 33°49′W  /  30.817°N 33.817°W  / 30.817 -33.817 ., 12 June.

On 23 July 1943, during her seventh patrol, her planes sank U-527 at 35°25′N 27°56′W  /  35.417°N 27.933°W  / 35.417 -27.933 . George E. Badger, of her screen, sank U-613 during this patrol.

Bogue 's eighth patrol was her most productive with three German submarines sunk. U-86 was sunk by her planes on 29 November 1943 at 39°33′N 19°01′W  /  39.55°N 19.017°W  / 39.55 -19.017 . On 30 November, TBF Avengers from Bogue damaged U-238 east of the Azores. [ 2 ] On 13 December U-172 was sunk by her planes, along with George E. Badger, Du Pont, Clemson and Osmond Ingram at 26°19′N 29°58′W  /  26.317°N 29.967°W  / 26.317 -29.967 . And on 20 December U-850 was sunk by planes at 32°54′N 37°01′W  /  32.9°N 37.017°W  / 32.9 -37.017 .

Bogue had a break from her anti-submarine operations during January and February 1944 when she carried a cargo of Army fighters to Glasgow, Scotland. The carrier then returned to her anti-submarine role and on 13 March her aircraft teamed with British planes, Haverfield, Hobson and Prince Rupert to sink U-575 at 46°18′N 27°34′W  /  46.3°N 27.567°W  / 46.3 -27.567 .

On 5 May 1944, Bogue and her escorts departed Hampton Roads, Virginia, for a cruise that netted two more submarines and lasted until 2 July. Francis M. Robinson, of the screen, sank the Japanese RO-501 (ex-German U-1224) on 13 May and Bogue’s aircraft sank the Japanese submarine I-52 at 15°16′N 39°55′W  /  15.267°N 39.917°W  / 15.267 -39.917 ., on 24 June. During the next cruise, 24 July–24 September 1944, Bogue's planes sank another German submarine, U-1229, 20 August at 42°20′N 51°39′W  /  42.333°N 51.65°W  / 42.333 -51.65 .

Following her return in September 1944, Bogue operated on training missions out of Bermuda and Quonset Point, Rhode Island, until February 1945 when she made a trip to Liverpool, England, with Army planes. In April 1945, she put to sea again as an anti-submarine vessel, forming part of Captain George J. Dufek's Second Barrier Force during Operation Teardrop. On 24 April, success came as Flaherty, Neunzer, Chatelain, Varian, Hubbard, Janssen, Pillsbury and Keith sank U-546. This was the last of 13 submarines sunk by Bogue or her escorts.

With the war in the Atlantic over, Bogue moved to the Pacific, arriving at San Diego 3 July 1945. She then steamed westward to Guam, arriving 24 July. She made a trip to Adak, Alaska (19 August to 6 September 1945), and then joined the "Operation Magic Carpet" fleet returning servicemen from the Pacific islands. She was placed out of commission in reserve 30 November 1946 at Tacoma, Washington.


CVE-9 U.S.S. Bogue - History

Bogue was laid down on 1 October 1941 as Steel Advocate (hull 170) under Maritime Commission contract by Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding in Tacoma, Washington. Bogue was launched 15 January 1942 sponsored by Mrs. W. Miller, Jr., wife of Lieutenant Commander Miller transferred to the United States Navy 1 May 1942 and commissioned 26 September 1942, Captain G. E. Short in command.

The ship was named for Bogue Sound in North Carolina.

Service History:
After an extensive shakedown and repair period Bogue joined the Atlantic Fleet in February 1943 as the nucleus of the pioneer American anti-submarine hunter-killer group. During March and April 1943 she made three North Atlantic crossings but sank no submarines. She departed on her fourth crossing 22 April and got her first submarine 22 May when her aircraft sank U-569 at 50°40′N 35°21′W.

During her fifth North Atlantic cruise her planes sank two German submarines: U-217 at 30°18′N 42°50′W., 5 June and U-118 at 30°49′N 33°49′W., 12 June.

On 23 July 1943, during her seventh patrol, her planes sank U-527 at 35°25′N 27°56′W. The destroyer George E. Badger, of her screen, sank U-613 during this patrol.

Bogue's eighth patrol was her most productive with three German submarines sunk. U-86 was sunk by her planes on 29 November 1943 at 39°33′N 19°01′W. On 30 November, Grumman TBF Avengers from Bogue damaged U-238 east of the Azores. On 13 December U-172 was sunk by her planes, along with destroyers George E. Badger, Du Pont, Clemson and Osmond Ingram at 26°19′N 29°58′W. And on 20 December U-850 was sunk by planes at 32°54′N 37°01′W.

Bogue had a break from her anti-submarine operations during January and February 1944 when she carried a cargo of Army fighters to Glasgow, Scotland. The carrier then returned to her anti-submarine role and on 13 March her aircraft teamed with British planes, Haverfield, Hobson and the RCN River-class frigate HMCS Prince Rupert to sink U-575 at 46°18′N 27°34′W.

On 5 May 1944, Bogue and her escorts departed Hampton Roads, Virginia, for a cruise that netted two more submarines and lasted until 2 July. Francis M. Robinson, of the screen, sank the Japanese RO-501 (ex-German U-1224) on 13 May and Bogue’s aircraft sank the Japanese submarine I-52 at 15°16′N 39°55′W., on 24 June. During the next cruise, 24 July–24 September 1944, Bogue's planes sank another German submarine, U-1229, 20 August at 42°20′N 51°39′W.


USS Bogue (ACV-9), 1945.
[Source: www.navsource.org]

With the war in the Atlantic over, Bogue moved to the Pacific, arriving at San Diego 3 July 1945. She then steamed westward to Guam, arriving 24 July. She made a trip to Adak, Alaska (19 August to 6 September 1945), and then joined the "Operation Magic Carpet" fleet returning servicemen from the Pacific islands. She was placed out of commission in reserve 30 November 1946 at Tacoma, Washington.


Porta Aviões de Escolta USS "Bogue", CVE 9

O J Division me solicitou este tópico para abordarmos algo sobre esta unidade da Marinha Americana, e me pediu para citar tbm algo sobre o kit do USS" Bogue" de escala 1/700.

Vou iniciar com algo sobre o Histórico do navio real e características e depois passamos ao kit.

Grande abraço: Marcus Silva

USS Bogue (CVE-9) was the lead ship in the Bogue-class of escort aircraft carriers in the United States Navy during World War II. She was originally classified AVG-9, but was changed to ACV-9, 20 August 1942 CVE-9, 15 July 1943 and CVHP-9, 12 June 1955.

Bogue was laid down on 1 October 1941 as Steel Advocate (hull 170) under Maritime Commission contract by Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding in Tacoma, Washington. Bogue was launched 15 January 1942 sponsored by Mrs. W. Miller, Jr., wife of Lieutenant Commander Miller transferred to the United States Navy 1 May 1942 and commissioned 26 September 1942, Captain G. E. Short in command.

The ship was named for Bogue Sound in North Carolina.

After an extensive shakedown and repair period Bogue joined the Atlantic Fleet in February 1943 as the nucleus of the pioneer American anti-submarine hunter-killer group. During March and April 1943 she made three North Atlantic crossings but sank no submarines. She departed on her fourth crossing 22 April and got her first submarine 22 May when her aircraft sank U-569 at 50°40′N 35°21′W / 50.667°N 35.35°W / 50.667 -35.35.

During her fifth North Atlantic cruise her planes sank two German submarines: U-217 at 30°18′N 42°50′W / 30.3°N 42.833°W / 30.3 -42.833., 5 June and U-118 at 30°49′N 33°49′W / 30.817°N 33.817°W / 30.817 -33.817., 12 June.

On 23 July 1943, during her seventh patrol, her planes sank U-527 at 35°25′N 27°56′W / 35.417°N 27.933°W / 35.417 -27.933. George E. Badger, of her screen, sank U-613 during this patrol.

Bogue 's eighth patrol was her most productive with three German submarines sunk. U-86 was sunk by her planes on 29 November 1943 at 39°33′N 19°01′W / 39.55°N 19.017°W / 39.55 -19.017. On 30 November, TBF Avengers from Bogue damaged U-238 east of the Azores.[2] On 13 December U-172 was sunk by her planes, along with George E. Badger, Du Pont, Clemson and Osmond Ingram at 26°19′N 29°58′W / 26.317°N 29.967°W / 26.317 -29.967. And on 20 December U-850 was sunk by planes at 32°54′N 37°01′W / 32.9°N 37.017°W / 32.9 -37.017.

Bogue had a break from her anti-submarine operations during January and February 1944 when she carried a cargo of Army fighters to Glasgow, Scotland. The carrier then returned to her anti-submarine role and on 13 March her aircraft teamed with British planes, Haverfield, Hobson and Prince Rupert to sink U-575 at 46°18′N 27°34′W / 46.3°N 27.567°W / 46.3 -27.567.

On 5 May 1944, Bogue and her escorts departed Hampton Roads, Virginia, for a cruise that netted two more submarines and lasted until 2 July. Francis M. Robinson, of the screen, sank the Japanese RO-501 (ex-German U-1224) on 13 May and Bogue’s aircraft sank the Japanese submarine I-52 at 15°16′N 39°55′W / 15.267°N 39.917°W / 15.267 -39.917., on 24 June. During the next cruise, 24 July–24 September 1944, Bogue's planes sank another German submarine, U-1229, 20 August at 42°20′N 51°39′W / 42.333°N 51.65°W / 42.333 -51.65.

Following her return in September 1944, Bogue operated on training missions out of Bermuda and Quonset Point, Rhode Island, until February 1945 when she made a trip to Liverpool, England, with Army planes. In April 1945, she put to sea again as an anti-submarine vessel, forming part of Captain George J. Dufek's Second Barrier Force during Operation Teardrop. On 24 April, success came as Flaherty, Neunzer, Chatelain, Varian, Hubbard, Janssen, Pillsbury and Keith sank U-546. This was the last of 13 submarines sunk by Bogue or her escorts.

With the war in the Atlantic over, Bogue moved to the Pacific, arriving at San Diego 3 July 1945. She then steamed westward to Guam, arriving 24 July. She made a trip to Adak, Alaska (19 August to 6 September 1945), and then joined the "Operation Magic Carpet" fleet returning servicemen from the Pacific islands. She was placed out of commission in reserve 30 November 1946 at Tacoma, Washington

Em 1944/1945, portando esquema de camuflagem Measure 32 Design 4A:

Quando for confeccionar uma bandeira para colocar em um modelo da época da Segunda Guerra Mundial, lembre-se que os EUA tinham 48 estados naquele período, então a bandeira deve ter 48 estrelas.
Veja a foto:

Fazendo menção já a algo do kit, aponto que é muito importante a em um projeto desses definir o ano, e talvez até mes em que vai retratar o navio.
As embarcações em geral, ainda mais no período da segunda guerra mundial, sofreram várias reformas, mudanças de esquema de pintura e características, de forma que é sempre bom especificar nas montagens que ano o modelo vai ser retratado, o que considero um marco inicial na escolha do trabalho. E isso deve ser feito de acordo com as características do kit pq geralmente vem uma recomendação para isso nas instruções. Dessa forma pode se garantir uma maior perfeição na retratação, e acertar as cores do navio.
Para os anos de 1942 até 1945, o CVE 9 Bogue, um porta-avioes de escolta ( a partir de Julho de 1943 ) ou Escort Carrier da classe Bogue, portou 2 sistemas diferentes de camuflagem.

No caso deste navio o numero 9 é o INDICATIVO VISUAL do navio.

Em Agosto de 1942 a classificação do navio era de Porta-Aviões Auxiliar.

Aqui um modelo do USS Bogue, retratado para o ano de 1944, portando um esquema de camuflagem MS32 design 4a:

A Gold Medal Models tem um set de PE de melhorias para este kit, veja aqui ( 700-24 WW2 USN ESCORT/LIGHT CARRIER ):

O kit citado do USS"Bogue" trás decal com numeral 20 para ser aplicado no convés de vôo ( em duas posições, proa e popa ) como indicativo visual , daí que isso possibilita fazer o navio USS "Barnes", também um CVE da classe Bogue.
E nesse caso , se o modelista optar por usar esse indicativo e retratar o USS "Barnes" terá opção de utilizar esquemas de pintura MS14 para o ano de 1943 e MS21 para 1944 e 1945. Se o manual contiver instruções para utilizar o MS22 ( para que ano. ) me parece incorreto para retratar o USS "Barnes".
Nesse kit tbm há que pesquisar o padrão da superestrutura da "ilha" para o navio USS Barnes, fazendo a opção correta dentre as alternativas que vem no kit para essa parte do navio. A diferença que conheço que ocorreu na superestrutura destes navios foi para uma mesma unidade, que foi modificada de um ano para outro, e não de tipos diferentes para navios da mesma classe, se bem que essa última alternativa ainda pode ser considerada. Levando isso em conta, pode haver um tipo de peça para fazer a estrutura por exemplo do USS Bogue, e outra para algum outro navio, ou essa diferença é para a alternativa de um mesmo navio para anos diferentes. Vou mostrar depois isso aqui em fotos.

Deixo um abração: Marcus Silva

Vista aérea do USS Barnes em Julho de 1943, transportando 25 aviões P-38 Lightning e 15 P-47 Thunderbolt do Exército americano no convés. As asas dos aviões P-38 foram retiradas e estocadas no hangar do navio. ( A foto foi colocada num site de host pq é de Alta Resolução)

Durante a Segunda Guerra Mundial os porta-aviões de escolta muitas vezes foram empregados nesta função, assegurando um suprimento constante de aeronaves para esquadrões de todos os serviços na linha de frente.

O USS Barnes praticamente serviu toda sua carreira no Pacífico, transportando aeronaves e suprimentos naquele Teatro. Sua principal tarefa no Conflito foi o transporte de pessoal e aviões dos Estados Unidos para áreas do Pacífico. Além disso serviu como navio de treino de combate e qualificação de pilotos navais. Enquanto levava a cabo essas tarefas, o navio lançou seus aviões em vários raids contra Tarawa na operação das Ilhas Gilbert ( 20 de Novembro/ 5 de Dezembro de 1943 ). O USS Barnes tbm proveu reabastecimento para aeronaves de vários Grupos-Tarefa da Terceira Frota durante operações das Ilhas Caroline Ocidentais ( 16 de Setembro/ 14 de Outubro de 1944 ) e também nos ataques em Luzon ( 19 de Outubro de 1944).

Vamos ver aqui a lateral da superestrutura do USS Bogue em 1942. Essa parte é lisa ( seta vermelha ) e a amurada que faz a proteção em redor da área do passadiço ( ou tijupá?) termina antes da antepara frontal da estrutura, onde ficariam as vigias do passadiço ( seta em azul ).

Reparem que esta parte do navio é diferente nesta captação de 1945:

A lateral não é mais lisa, existem umas barras paralelas em posição vertical, que talvez sejam longarinas de reforço estrutural ( seta vermelha ), e a amurada neste ponto agora se estende além da antepara frontal da ilha ( seta azul ).

Essas características da ilha aparecem como na foto que postei anteriormente do modelo do Bogue retratado para o ano de 1944:

E aqui a mesma diferença na ilha.
No caso o navio é o USS Core ( CVE 13 ). A primeira foto é de Janeiro de 1943, e a outra de um período posterior.

E outra diferença, por baixo da ilha, vejam os 3 braços de sustentação, tbm reforço estrutural adicionado ( setas em vermelho ), talvez em função de instalação de novo radar e outros elementos:

Adiante imagens de outras caixas de kits de navios classe Bogue:

Nessa segunda imagem vemos um CVE da classe Ruler, com bandeira inglesa. Isso se deve ao fato de que vários navios da classe Bogue foram transferidos para a Royal Navy durante a Segunda Guerra e estes navios foram redesignados para este país sob nova classe com nome Ruler. O PA Escolta de designação D-24 HMS Tracker era originalmente um classe Bogue, construído nos EUA ( como navio mercante ), transferido para a Marinha Inglesa sob designação de classe Ruler, ou até mesmo classe Attacker.

Para obter imagens de navios, deixo uma dica de site:

Agora vou levantar uma questão: estamos acostumados com a ideía a que um porta-aviões tenha um grupo aéreo embarcado, ou um carrier air wing, mais ou menos com unidades aéreas fixas, um numero certo de aviões designado por V_, a partir de onde se lançam operações, lógico que os mesmos sofrem algumas pequenas alterações, mas o que se pode observar no caso do USS "Barnes", é um conceito diferente, com o navio transportando aviões para um Teatro, ou até mesmo operando um grupo como foi o caso do episódio nas Ilhas Gilbert fazendo operações com um grupo aéreo designado VF-1, composto por 22 aeronaves F6Fs Hellcat (Novembro a Dezembro de 1943 ). Em Março de 1944 o Barnes embarcava o VF-34, composto por 30 F6Fs, mas eu sinceramente não sei informar se esse grupo aéreo foi utilizado nas operações das Ilhas Caroline de Setembro a Outubro de 1944 e nos ataques a Luzon, tbm em Outubro deste mesmo ano.
Dessa forma, me é obscuro definir um grupo aéreo para estes navios na época da guerra e tbm acredito que os fabricantes se deram a esta indefinição, e não seria este o motivo a que se dessem a atitudes como fazer caixas avulsas, contendo aviões variados, de forma a que a responsabilidade de aplicação de unidades recaia sobre o modelista? Por outro lado, o que temos de certeza por parte de operações, foram os transportes dos aviões ( isso pq temos a evidência fotográfica ), o que pode tbm ser uma opção para os modelistas buscarem retratar.

Grande abraço : Marcus Silva

De posse do referido kit do USS "Bogue", e tendo que fazer opção por montar ou o Bogue ou o Barnes, tenha em mente o seguinte:

Quando se opta por retaratar o kit como o USS Barnes ( tbm por causa do decal do indicativo visual com numeral 20 ), então o modelo tem q seguir o padrão do navio original, pelo menos em teoria. O USS Barnes tinha instalado no seu mastro uma antena de radar SC, e pelo que contém na caixa para radar de busca aérea, que é a antena do radar é do tipo SK, é um tipo de antena maior do que deveria ser. Ela deve ter sido provida para retratar o Bogue .

Veja nas fotos que vou mostrar a diferença entre os dois tipos.

Essa foto é do USS Barnes, em 1944, repare as proporções da antena do radar SC de busca aérea com as laterais da ilha, que batem mais ou menos em largura:

Aqui um zoom, na "ilha", e veja no topo do mastro a antena do radar SC, ele é pequeno. essa foto é do USS Barnes em 1943:

Aqui um navio da classe Bogue, o USS Copahee, veja como a antena, do tipo SK é maior que a que o USS Barnes tinha.

Aqui as antenas em separado ( de fotos de outros navios. ), para evidenciar o formato de cada tipo:

A antena do radar SC ( igual a do USS Barnes ):

Foto do radar SG de superfície (igual ao do USS Barnes ):

Outra coisa importante:
em 1943 o USS Bogue tinha uma antena de radar de busca aérea do tipo SC:

Já em 1944, ele portava uma tipo SK:

E de 1943 para 1944 o USS Bogue sofreu modificações na ilha, o que pode ser visto comparando as duas fotos acima.

Então acho que podemos concluir que a antena que vem no kit é o tipo SK, que atende as características do Bogue para 1944.

Mas indico, pelo padrão da antena, que é um tanto grosseiro, que o modelista utilize algum tipo de peça em photoetch e daí poderá ter os dois tipos de antena de busca aérea e dessa forma ficar livre para escolher a datação do seu kit.

E para clarear tbm, a antena do radar de busca de superficie do USS Barnes, para vários anos, era do tipo SG, mas acho q ela fica ínfima em 1/700.
Deixo um abração: Marcus Silva

O set de radares da WEM, em 1/700, apontei em vermelho a antena do radar SC. Compare a proporção para a antena SK, que apontei em azul:

Aqui o set da GMM, a antena do SC está apontada em vermelho:

Este set é bem legal, pq inclusive tem detalhamento do mastro dos CVEs. Interessante observar neste set tbm que o fabricante aloca a antena tipo SK para os CVEs, e as antenas SC para os CVLs.

Veja o mastro do USS Bogue, que fica mais bonito com a melhoria de photoetch:

E aqui umas alterações sugeridas na ilha, inclusive com os reforços na parte de baixo da superestrutura:

O seguinte texto contém um resumo de operações do USS "Bogue", e sua presença aqui é uma tentativa de contabilizar ou estabelecer a presença a bordo de certos grupos aéreos e respectivos períodos.

Era padrão da classe Bogue operar até 28 aviões, mas o comum era ter a bordo de 19 a 24 unidades operando.
O USS Bogue foi incorporado a US Navy em 26 de Setembro de 1942, mas somente foi designado como porta-aviões de escolta em 15 de Julho de 1943.
Para testes de mar em Novembro de 1942, o navio recebeu a bordo o VC-9 como seu primeiro esquadrão embarcado, o que ocoreu em San Diego. Já num período operativo de 6 de Março de 1943, enquanto escoltava o Comboio HX-228 registrou-se presença a bordo de 12 aviões F4F-4 Wildcats e 8 TBF-1 Avengers.
Após operações com os comboios SC-123, e HX-235 no período de Março até Abril de 1943, o USS Bogue chegou a Belfast em Maio daquele ano, iniciando um treinamento antisubmarino, e de onde partiu com seu grupo aéreo aumentado em 4 unidades de aviões Avengers, ou seja, 12 Avengers e 12 Wildcats registrados a bordo.
Em 19 de Maio de 1943, o Bogue se reune ao Comboio ON-184, onde realizam-se várias operações ASW, e seguem estas com registros até Agosto de 1943, inclusive com ocrrencias entre aviões do Bogue e submarinos alemães.
Em Setembro de 1943 o VC-19 embarca no Bogue que sai em missão de caça a submarinos inimigos no Atlantico.
Em Dezembro de 1943 o Bogue encontrava-se em Bermuda e parte para uma missão transportando aviões P-47 para a Inglaterra.
Da Inglaterra o Bogue retorna para Norfolk, nos EUA, onde por evento de mar forte sofre danos e é submetido a reparos. O navio recebe então a bordo o grupo aéreo VC-95 e parte em missão com cobertura de destroyers. Em 13 de Março de 1944 há registro de ocorrencia de uma aeronave Avenger do Bogue com um submarino alemão, e desta cronologia, eu entendo que o VC-95 embarcou em algum período entre Janeiro e Março de 1944.
Em 5 de Maio de 1944, o Bogue parte de Hampton Roads com aeronaves do VC-69, assim contabilizados: 9 FM-2 Wildcats e 12 TBF-1C Avengers.
No período de Maio de 1944 até Junho do mesmo ano, houveram ocorrencias de encontro no Atlantico entre aeronaves do navio com dois submarinos japoneses.
Em Julho de 1944 o Bogue estaciona em Norfolk e embarca o VC-42 junto com 4 aeronaves TBM-1D Avenger equipados com radar e holofotes, e no fim de Julho de 1944 parte em missão de treinamento e segue até Bermuda.
Em 1 de Agosto de 1944 o Bogue parte de Bermuda com 9 Wildcats e 14 Avengers a bordo.
Em 16 de Agosto de 1944 o Bogue sofre ataque de um submarino alemão, mas um avião Avenger faz detecção do submarino por radar.
Em 20 de Agosto de 1944 um Avenger efetuou ataque contra um submarino alemão com foguetes e bombas de profundidade.

Em final de 1944 e inicio de 1945 o USS Bogue encontrava-se em exercício de treinamento e também efetuou transporte de 60 aviões P-51 para Liverpool ( Inglaterra ) em 23 de Fevereiro de 1945, retornando a Norfolk em 12 de Março de 1945.
Em 16 de Abril de 1945 com cobertura de 10 destroyers, o Bogue partiu de Quonset, e fez reunir a bordo o VC-19, contabilizando 3 aviões FM-2 Wildcats e 16 TBM-3 Avengers. Dessa forma o grupo do Bogue reuniu-se ao grupo do USS Core com a cobertura de 12 destroyers deste, e que formavam uma linha de patrulha de 70 milhas náuticas. Em 23 de Abril de 1945 aviões do Bogue iniciaram ocorrencia com um submarino alemão.
O USS Bogue chegou ao fim da guerra transportando aeronaves e pessoal para a região do Pacífico, e foi colocado na Reserva em 30 de Novembro de 1946.

Aqui uma colocação sobre operação a bordo do USS Bogue de outro tipo de avião:

"By late 1942 four escort carriers were operating with Curtiss SOC-3A's in the Pacific Fleet: VGS-9 aboard the U.S.S. Bogue, VGS-11 on the U.S.S. Card, VGS-13 on the U.S.S. Core, and VGS-18 on the U.S.S. Altamaha. In addition the U.S.S. Charger, assigned to the Atlantic Fleet, was operating 8 SOC-3A's and 3 SON-1A's as VGS-30. In March 1943 VGS-1 became VC-I and the other VGS squadrons converted to Composite Squadrons and exchanged their SOC's for TBF-1's."

Caro Marcus Silva, conforme já conversamos por e-mail, gostei muito das postagens nesse tópico, e vim aqui no aberto agradecer a você pelo empenho na tarefa, ,muito obrigado por sua atenção, e as informações estão bem sólidas e relacionads a fontes, e são objetivas, tenho certeza que isso auxiliará a montagem de algum colega que escolha este kit.
E para kits na escala 1/350, as informações tbm são úteis.
A Iron Shipwrights tem um kit destes, veja o texto do colega Richard Sliwka sobre sua montagem:

"This is the Commander Series Bogue kit released in 2006. I hadn't attempted a carrier so decided an escort carrier would be a good starting point. This was a relatively easy "build" with a few challenges. The first was the lack of detailed instructions--the kit provided a very basic one sheet diagram. I enlarged the Bogue Class drawing in Freidmann's U.S. Aircraft Carriers and used the photographs in Squadron's Escort Carriers as my basic references. The second challenge was the kit provided bass wood Nautilus Models flight deck--a different medium. I sealed the wood flight deck with Floquil Wood Sealer--it took a half bottle (1 oz.). Then I painted the sealed deck with Model Masters Flight Deck 21 Stain. It took 3-4 airbrushed coats to cover a dark natural grain in the wood but, it finally worked.

Added flight deck details were the fore and aft safety railings and the underside catwalks scratch-built from various Special Shapes brass grid sheets. 004" dia. nylon thread was used for the arresting/barrier wires. The mast/yardarm was detailed with scratch-built antennae, bracing, lights, etc. The froward HF/DF mast/antenna was from GMM DE photo-etch set. Also, added were scratch-built 24" searchlights, rangefinders, spot lights, signal lamps, speakers, running lights, flight deck edge lift raft mounting frames etc. L'Arsenal 20mm guns, 40mm mounts, 5"38 open mounts mounts, 26' whaleboats, paravanes, and Mk 51 directors were added. The model was painted in the Measure 32/4a camouflage scheme (5-P, 5-L, 5-H and 5-N) using Floating Drydock sheets and photographs as reference. I attempted to reproduce the soft/over spray edges as the diagram/photos indicated. Flight deck markings/numbers were painted. All paints used were Model Master Marine acrylics. Trumpeter Wildcat and Avenger aircraft were used. The total time spent on this model was about 250 hours."

Marcus, o modelo do Bogue apresenta 1 hélice apenas, com passo à esquerda.

Você tem fonte comprovando isso, que o hélice tenha esse passo?
Olha o "Niantic" com passo direito:

Que comclusão tiramos disso?

JD, vou mandar aqui prmeiro um link com fotos de cves transferidos para a Royal Navy:

Vou depois abrir todas as fotos deste site e postar aqui.

A conclusão pela questão dos hélices, posso interpretar em primeira vista que:
1. O fabricante do kit errou o passo.
2. A classe ( real ) tinha hélices virando para ambos os bordos ( em navios distintos. ), e assim o fabricante daquele modelo poderia ter acertado.
3. Tem que continuar pesquisa para encontrar fotos dos navios docados.


Watch the video: Battlestation Pacific, USS Bogue CVE-9 (August 2022).