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The Rector’s Palace

The Rector’s Palace



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The Rector’s Palace dates back to the time when Dubrovnik was the centre of a republic by the name of Ragusa (14th century – 1808). At this time, Dubrovnik was ruled by a rector, whose seat was this historic building. The first incarnation of the palace, built in the 12th century was destroyed and rebuilt in the 15th century. Indeed the palace underwent several rebuilds, at least twice due to gunpowder explosions from the armoury that was housed within. This was just one of many roles the Rector’s Palace fulfilled. Not only was it the place the rector lived and worked, but it was also a prison, administrative offices and home to public halls.

Today, the Rector’s Palace takes one back to the Ragusan Republic as a cultural museum of the time.


Rector's Palace

One of the most significant monuments of profane architecture on the Croatian coast is the Rector&aposs Palace, former administrative centre of the Dubrovnik Republic. Its style is basically Gothic, with the Renaissance and Baroque reconstructions. In the 15th century the Palace was destroyed twice in gunpowder explosions. Restored by Onofrio della Cava in the late Gothic style after the first explosion in 1435, the Palace got its present-day size with the central atrium and front portico. The capitals were carved in Renaissance style by Pietro di Martino of Milan, whose capital with Aesculapius has been preserved on the right half-column of the portico.

The second gunpowder explosion in 1463 destroyed the western facade of the Palace, and the two famous architects Juraj Dalmatinac and Michelozzo of Florence were engaged in the reconstruction for a short period.Although the design of Michelozzo was unfortunately rejected, his influence in the restoration of the facade and portico, mainly in Renaissance style, can not be denied. After the earthquake of 1667 the atrium was partially reconstructed with an impressive Baroque staircase.

During his one-month mandate the Rector of Dubrovnik lived in the Palace, which also housed the Minor and Major Council hall, the Rectors residence, the courtroom, administration office, prisons, an arsenal and gunpowder store-house. From the Rectors Palace one could enter the Great Council Palace.

Today the Rectors Palace houses the Cultural-historic Department of the Dubrovnik Museum with exhibition halls arranged to display the original setting with antique furniture and objects for daily use, as well as paintings by local and Italian masters.

The Museum also guards a collection of old coins used in the Dubrovnik Republic, a collection of arms and utensils of Domus Christi Pharmacy from the 15th century. Apart from being exceptionally beautiful, the Rectors Palace Atrium has excellent acoustics, and is often used as a concert venue.


Rector's Palace, Dubrovnik

The Rector's Palace (Croatian: Knežev dvor) is a palace in the city of Dubrovnik that used to serve as the seat of the Rector of the Republic of Ragusa between the 14th century and 1808. [1] It was also the seat of the Minor Council and the state administration. Furthermore, it housed an armoury, the powder magazine, the watch house and a prison.

The rector's palace was built in the Gothic style, but it also has Renaissance and Baroque elements, harmoniously combining these elements. [1]

Originally it was a site of a defence building in the early Middle Ages. It was destroyed by a fire in 1435 and the town decided to build a new palace. The job was offered to the master builder Onofrio della Cava of Naples, who had previously built the aqueduct. It became a Gothic building with ornaments sculpted by Pietro di Martino of Milan. A gunpowder explosion badly damaged the building in 1463. The renewal was offered to the architect Michelozzo of Florence. But he was rejected in 1464 because his plans were too much in the style of the Renaissance. Other builders continued the work. The capitals of the porch were reshaped in Renaissance style probably by Salvi di Michele of Florence. He continued the reconstruction from 1467 on. The building suffered damages from the earthquake of 1520 and again in 1667. Reconstruction was in Baroque style. A flight of stairs and a bell were added in the atrium. In 1638 the Senate erected a monument to Miho Pracat (by Pietro Giacometti of Recanati), a rich shipowner from Lopud, who had bequeathed his wealth to Dubrovnik.

The History Department of the Museum of Dubrovnik has operated in the palace since 1872. [2]


The Rector’s Palace - History

Free Entry with The Dubrovnik Card

The Cultural Historical Museum is located in the Rectors Palace whose exhibits are distributed throughout the ground floor, mezzanine and First Floor.

A court room, dungeon and a scribes office are located on the ground floor. A numismatic collection of Dubrovnik coins, seals, weights, and a collection of watches are on the mezzanine level. Beautiful examples of furniture, portraits, uniforms, and an inventory from the Domus Christi pharmacy, as well as various kinds of weapons can also be seen.

Rococo, baroque and Louis XVI furniture and paintings by Italian masters are on the 1st floor. In the Rectors study, there is a portrait of Hamzić, a member of the Dubrovnik Painters School from the 16th century, and a writing desk by Luko Giordan. The Rectors rococo bedroom is located on the south side.

There is a permanent exhibition of artistic paintings, furniture and everyday items dating between the 16th and 19th centuries in the suitably decorated rooms of the Rectors Palace, the seat of the Dubrovnik Republics Rector and government, as well as a collection of old Dubrovnik money, medallions, seals, coat of arms and weapons.

Museum is closed in next period:
1. December 2015. &ndash 1. June 2016.

Working hours in winter (3 November - 21 March):
9.00 am - 4.00 pm, every day

Working hours in summer (22 March - 2 November):
9.00 am - 6.00 pm, every day


Rector's Palace

The Palace of Rectors is the former seat of the Small Council, which together with the Big Council and the Council of Simplified People constituted the democratically elected government of the Republic of Ragusa, known as the Dubrovnik Republic. The records in the city chronicles show that the Rectors Palace already existed in the 13th century. The building that has survived to this day is an object combining elements of Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque. It is now the seat of a museum, which collects furniture, a rich numismatic collection and a collection of weapons.

Rectors Palace was repeatedly destroyed by fires and earthquakes. For the first time it was almost completely destroyed as a result of gunpowder explosion in 1435. Reconstruction was entrusted to the Italian architect Onofrio della Cava, and then Florence-based Michelozzo di Bartolommeo (called Michelozzo Michelozzi), whose work was completed by Juraj from Dalmatia (as well as the construction of the Tower Minčeta). After the earthquake in 1667, the building was restored to its previous glory by builders brought from Korčula.

The system of the Republic of Dubrovnik was, for those times, very democratic. The highest authority belonged to the Rector, who was elected once a month (exceptionally for longer periods). While in office, the Rector moved to the palace and swore not to deal with any private matters in order to devote himself fully to the service of the city. In the Rectors Palace, next to the rooms intended for meetings of the authorities, there was also a prison and a city arsenal.

The end of the Republic resembles a clock, which traditionally stopped at 5.45 on May 26, 1806 - exactly at the time when Dubrovnik was occupied by Napoleon's army.


A Guide to Dubrovnik Museums

Once you step inside Dubrovnik Old City you will feel as if you've walked into a movie set, behind the authentic scenes from another (long gone) world. And you will not be mistaken. The city is a museum itself, ornamented with historical churches, houses, and palaces carved in white stone, witnessing the clash between ancient and everyday life.

It's no surprise, then, that Dubrovnik, with its reputation, has a thriving cultural museum scene that tells the story of the past, art, science, and even life itself. And they are all well worth seeing when exploring Dubrovnik, as one would expect from a city rich in history, tradition, and natural beauty.

Dubrovnik Museums unites Cultural History Museum in the Rector’s Palace, Maritime Museum in Fort St John, Ethnographic Museum Rupe, and Archaeological exhibitions in Revelin Fort.

The origins of the Cultural History Museum go way back to 1872 when the Patriotic Museum was founded. The museum's collection includes approximately 20,000 artifacts collected between the end of the 15th and the beginning of the 20th centuries, with a focus on cultural, historical, and artistic significance. The permanent exhibition is housed in the Rector's Palace and presents the artistic and historical heritage of the Dubrovnik Republic, so if you want to experience the rector’s life on your own you’ve come to the right place! The state offices, courtroom, and jail on the ground floor, as well as the church, reception rooms, and the rector's apartment on the first floor, with his library, central space, and bedroom will leave you speechless.

Have you ever heard of Miho Pracat, whose bust can be found today in the Rector's Palace? He was the first and the only commoner in the Dubrovnik Republic to whom a monument was erected. The statue is the work of Italian sculptor Jacometti, completed in 1638. The statue is shown in the sixth episode of the second season of the Game of Thrones series, which was filmed in the Rector's Palace.

Dubrovnik Natural History Museum also has a long tradition and was first founded in 1872, with a donation from the Chamber of Trade and Crafts and the private collection of pharmacist and ship-owner Antun Drobac. Museums encourage children to discover our enthralling world, and this one will do just that with its fascinating collection of 100-year-old taxidermy specimens.

Dubrovnik is known for its rich maritime tradition. At the Maritime Museum, located inside St John fortress, you can marvel at Dubrovnik's prosperous maritime history and how its sailing tradition has evolved over the centuries, all the way since Antiquity. Today, the museum proudly holds over five thousand objects classified into fifteen collections.

Rupe Ethnographic Museum showcases the granary and storage of the state grain and wheat reserves in deep pits cut into the rock. Acquaint yourselves with the customs and folk costume of the Dubrovnik region, and remember that you are observing a significant piece of the living history of the region.

Home of Marin Držić is the smallest museum in Dubrovnik. The museum is dedicated to the life and work of one of the greatest Croatian comedians - Marin Držić. It is a theatre museum, a scientific-documentary institute, and an exhibition space.

Parts of the Franciscan pharmacy (Europe's third oldest working pharmacy) are on display at the Franciscan Monastery Museum, located in the renaissance hall accessible from the cloister. The museum guards paintings from renowned painters, a collection of artefacts and liturgical items, gold jewellery, and other valuables.

Now, let’s talk about something more contemporary!

The interesting newcomer, a peculiar time capsule of the Yugoslavian everyday life of the working-class, is presented in Red History Museum. “Experience almost half a century of life under the communist regime - from secret services and the communist party to pop culture and the development of consumer society.” as stated on their official web page.

Dubrovnik is fortunate to have a variety of art galleries that represent its painters' work from the Dubrovnik Colourist School of Painting to more contemporary art exhibitions and collections. Established in 1945, the Museum of Modern Art Dubrovnik, stokes imagination, ignites minds and inspires.

The recent history of Dubrovnik is captured in two war museums: Homeland War Museum and War Photo Limited. Both nestled in superb locations, they tell an unbelievable story of Croatia’s devastating recent past.

Dubrovnik is widely known as one of the most romantic cities in the world so it's kind of expected to discover that it treasures Love Story Museum. Established with the idea of presenting real personal love stories and objects of great sentimental value from all four corners of the world, this is one of the most romantic museums you’ll ever see!

Explore Dubrovnik's remarkably diverse museum scene, and you'll be conveyed to a whole another world, concealed behind its narrow streets, warm sun, and a turquoise sea. Indeed, a true gem of the Adriatic in every way!


Rector's Palace (Dubrovnik, Croatia)

The Rector's Palace (or Knežev dvor in Croatian) is a palace in the city of Dubrovnik that used to serve as the seat of the Rector of the Republic of Ragusa between the 14th century and 1808. It was also the seat of the Minor Council and the state administration. Furthermore, it housed an armory, the powder magazine, the watch house and a prison.

The rector's palace was built in the Gothic style, but it also has Renaissance and Baroque elements, harmoniously combining these elements.

Originally it was a site of a defense building in the early Middle Ages. It was destroyed by a fire in 1435 and the town decided to build a new palace. The job was offered to the master builder Onofrio della Cava of Naples, who had previously built the aqueduct. It became a Gothic building with ornaments sculpted by Pietro di Martino of Milan. A gunpowder explosion badly damaged the building in 1463. The renewal was offered to the architect Michelozzo of Florence. But he was rejected in 1464 because his plans were too much in the style of the Renaissance. Other builders continued the work. The capitals of the porch were reshaped in Renaissance style probably by Salvi di Michele of Florence. He continued the reconstruction from 1467 on. The building suffered damages from the earthquake of 1520 and again in 1667. Reconstruction was in Baroque style. A flight of stairs and a bell were added in the atrium. In 1638 the Senate erected a monument to Miho Pracat (by Pietro Giacometti of Recanati), a rich shipowner from Lopud, who had bequeathed his wealth to Dubrovnik.

The History Department of the Museum of Dubrovnik has operated in the palace since 1872.


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The Rector's Palace

The Rector's palace was the centre of government in the old Dubrovnik Republic. It was the home of the Rector who was elected by the Great council to represent the Republic for a month and during that time he wasn't allowed to leave the palace at anytime except on government business which completely fits into the Dubrovnik Republic principle clearly stated above the doors of the Great council hall: "Obliti privatorum, publica curate" which meant "Forget private and deal with public business".

Mainly built in gothic style this building, simple and harmonic, seems almost too modest for the once so wealthy Dubrovnik. And that is not at all surprising as it is consistent with Dubrovnik omnipresent unpretentious style of building with no exaggerated luxury. Upon entering The Rector's palace one gets the impression of the past centuries returning and holds breath as if seeing the Rector himself followed by the members of The Small council (executive government body).

The Rector's palace was built in mid 15th century by the famous Neapolitan architect Onofrio di Giordano de la Cava who also constructed the Dubrovnik's waterworks (water supply system) and the famous fountains, Big and Small Onofrio's fountains.

Later when the palace was damaged in 1463 by gunpowder explosion, it was partly reconstructed by Salvi di Michele and the local craftsman adding Renaissance elements. Resulting from damage in the Great earthquake in the year of 1667 the atrium was reconstructed to some extent in baroque style adding the final touch to the Rector's palace, the way we see it today.

The Rector's palace atrium today is one of the most impressive ambient for classical and chamber music concerts traditionally played here, especially during the Dubrovnik Summer Festival. Atrium is decorated with one small fountain in gothic style dating to the 15th century and the bust of the Dubrovnik's famous seaman and merchant Miho Pracat, the only such laurel given to the common man in The Dubrovnik Republic.

The Rector's palace today is a Cultural Historical Museum featuring authentic exhibition halls with numerous items from rich Dubrovnik history:

- Collection of Paintings
- Miscellaneous Collection
- Ceramics Collection
- Collection of Icons
- Collection of Metalwork
- Collection of Textiles
- Furniture Collection
- Glassware Collection
- Collection of Photography and photographic material

Let us just mention that the Collection of paintings includes the paintings of grandmaster's like Carracci, Tintoretto, Giorgione, Bordone and many others.

To learn more about the Rector's palace go to:

General information about the Rector's palace:

ADDRESS:
Pred dvorom 3,
20 000 Dubrovnik, Croatia

Phone: +385 (0)20 426 469
Fax: +385 (0)20 428 469

WORKING HOURS:
. Monday - Saturday
- winter: 9 -13
- summer: 9 - 13 and 16 -17
- Sunday (only during the summer): 9-13


Watch the video: Adele - When We Were Young Rectors Palace Live Cover (August 2022).